McBratney Reserve

Discover a red maple swamp up close on a peaceful stroll at McBratney Reserve. Don’t let the small size of this Dartmouth Natural Resources Trust reserve fool you – these 5 acres abound with interesting natural features that will delight your whole family, including a cultivated blueberry patch at the end of the trail.

Features

trail through the woods at McBratney Reserve in Dartmouth

The trail at McBratney Reserve has a rustic boardwalk that crosses a small stream.

Although it’s one of the smaller places in Dartmouth to take a walk, McBratney Reserve packs a lot of delightful sights into its space. Most of the property is a red maple swamp, with lichen-covered trees rising up from patches of standing water. But the feature that draws many people to McBratney Reserve is the cultivated blueberry patch hidden in the woods. Come here in summer to enjoy a sweet treat at the end of your walk!

Trails

McBratney Reserve has a short, out-and-back trail through the woods to the blueberry patch. The trail passes along a hilly, forested ridge and over a boardwalk across a small stream that runs between the swamps. It only takes about 10 minutes to reach the blueberry patch, but with so much to see along the way, you’ll want to take your time. (Download trail map)

Habitats & Wildlife

The southern and eastern portions of McBratney Reserve are covered by red maple swamp. As you head toward the property’s northwestern boundary, the landscape transitions to an upland forest of oak and pitch pine. These habitats draw many different types of wildlife, from frogs calling in the swampy areas to chipmunks scurrying along the forest floor.

Property Owned By

Dartmouth Natural Resources Trust (DNRT) is a nonprofit, accredited land trust. Since 1971, DNRT has helped protect more than 5,000 acres of land and maintain more than 35 miles of hiking trails in Dartmouth.

Details
Size: 5 acres
Hours: Dawn to dusk
Parking: Roadside parking along Smith Neck Road
Trail Difficulty: Intermediate
Dogs: Yes (under voice control)
Facilities: None
ADA Accessible: No

Please follow all posted rules and regulations at this property.

Address & Contact Information
667 Smith Neck Rd.
Dartmouth, MA 02748
41.563637, -70.953009

Please follow all posted rules and regulations at this property.

McBratney Reserve
Dartmouth, MA
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Upcoming Events Near Here

Evening Stroll in Beebe Woods
Wed, October 23
5:30PM - 7:00PM
Beebe Woods,
Falmouth
Itty Bitty Bay Explorers: Nature Yoga
Wed, October 23
10:00AM - 11:00AM
The Bogs,
Mattapoisett
Warm Flow Yoga
Wed, October 23
6:30PM - 7:45PM
Wildlands Trust,
Plymouth

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Current Issues

Land Conservation

Conserving land is one of the most important ways to protect clean water in Buzzards Bay. Since 1998, the Coalition has forever preserved more than 7,000 acres of land across our region.

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